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Cyclostationarity applied to acoustic emission and development of a new indicator for monitoring bearing defects

Kedadouche, M. et Thomas, M. et Tahan, A.. 2014. « Cyclostationarity applied to acoustic emission and development of a new indicator for monitoring bearing defects ». Mechanics & Industry, vol. 15, nº 6. p. 467-476.
Compte des citations dans Scopus : 2.

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Résumé

The exploitation of cyclostationarity properties of vibratory signals is now more widely used for monitoring rotating machinery and especially for diagnosing bearing defects. The acoustic Emission (AE) technology has also emerged as a reliable tool for preventive maintenance of rotating machines. In this study, we propose an experimental study that characterizes the cyclostationary aspect of Acoustic Emission signals recorded from a defective bearing (40μm on the outer race) to see its efficiency to detect a defect at its very early stage of degradation. An industrial sensor (UE10 000) is used. An electrical circuit converts the high frequency signal into an audible signal by heterodyning. The cyclic spectral density, which is a tool dedicated that to put into evidence the presence of cyclostationarity, is used for characterizing the cyclostationary. Two new indicators based on this cyclostationary technique are proposed and compared for early detection of defective bearings.

Type de document: Article publié dans une revue, révisé par les pairs
Professeur:
Professeur
Thomas, Marc
Tahan, Antoine
Affiliation: Génie mécanique
Date de dépôt: 29 oct. 2015 15:18
Dernière modification: 14 sept. 2017 14:24
URI: http://espace2.etsmtl.ca/id/eprint/11701

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