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Plasticity in the sensitivity to light in aging: Decreased non-visual impact of light on cognitive brain activity in older individuals but no impact of lens replacement

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Daneault, Véronique, Dumont, Marie, Massé, Éric, Forcier, Pierre, Boré, Arnaud, Lina, Jean-Marc, Doyon, Julien, Vandewalle, Gilles et Carrier, Julie. 2018. « Plasticity in the sensitivity to light in aging: Decreased non-visual impact of light on cognitive brain activity in older individuals but no impact of lens replacement ». Frontiers in Physiology, vol. 9.
Compte des citations dans Scopus : 3.

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Abstract

Beyond its essential visual role, light, and particularly blue light, has numerous nonvisual effects, including stimulating cognitive functions and alertness. Non-visual effects of light may decrease with aging and contribute to cognitive and sleepiness complaints in aging. However, both the brain and the eye profoundly change in aging. Whether the stimulating effects light on cognitive brain functions varies in aging and how ocular changes may be involved is not established. We compared the impact of blue and orange lights on non-visual cognitive brain activity in younger (23.6 ± 2.5 years), and older individuals with their natural lenses (NL; 66.7 ± 5.1 years) or with intraocular lens (IOL) replacement following cataract surgery (69.6 ± 4.9 years). Analyses reveal that blue light modulates executive brain responses in both young and older individuals. Light effects were, however, stronger in young individuals including in the hippocampus and frontal and cingular cortices. Light effects did not significantly differ between olderIOL and older-NL while regression analyses indicated that differential brain engagement was not underlying age-related differences in light effects. These findings show that, although its impact decreases, light can stimulate cognitive brain activity in aging. Since lens replacement did not affect light impact, the brain seems to adapt to the progressive decrease in retinal light exposure in aging.

Item Type: Peer reviewed article published in a journal
Professor:
Professor
Lina, Jean-Marc
Affiliation: Génie électrique
Date Deposited: 04 Dec 2018 20:22
Last Modified: 19 Oct 2020 18:23
URI: https://espace2.etsmtl.ca/id/eprint/17696

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