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Meteorological control on snow depth evolution and snowpack energy exchanges in an agro-forested environment by a measurement-based approach: A case study in Sainte-Marthe, Eastern Canada

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Dharmadasa, Vasana, Kinnard, Christophe and Baraër, Michel. 2024. « Meteorological control on snow depth evolution and snowpack energy exchanges in an agro-forested environment by a measurement-based approach: A case study in Sainte-Marthe, Eastern Canada ». Agricultural and Forest Meteorology, vol. 347.

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Abstract

A lack of field studies measuring snow mass and energy balance in open and forest patches hinders the holistic understanding of snowpack dynamics and makes it difficult to validate modeling efforts in agro-forested environments. In such context, this study explores the energy exchanges within snowpacks in an agro-forested environment in eastern Canada, with a focus on measuring energy fluxes and assessing temporal variability and meteorological controls on the snowpack. The results showed that there are considerable differences in energy fluxes between open, forest, and gap areas, with net radiation dominating the snow surface energy balance. During the accumulation period, longwave radiation had a greater influence on the variability of the energy balance, while during the ablation period, latent heat fluxes and solar radiation absorption dominated the variability of the energy balance and snowpack melting. Blowing snow also influenced the energy budget in the open area through negative feedback effects. Despite the negative feedback effects, results showed that the decreased air stability in response to the reduced temperature gradient between the atmosphere and snowpack counterbalanced the reduced vapor pressure gradient and resulted in slightly increased latent heat (sublimation) losses from the snowpack during blowing snow. Furthermore, our analysis showed reduced influxes of sensible heat and longwave radiation to the snowpack in response to the blowing snow cooling feedback on the atmosphere. These results emphasize the significant role of blowing snow for the energy exchanges in large windexposed open areas in humid continental agro-forested landscapes. Furthermore, the different snowpack and energy balance conditions between the open and forested patches of agro-forested landscapes highlighted in this study could have important implications for snowmelt infiltration patterns and resulting catchment-scale hydrology.

Item Type: Peer reviewed article published in a journal
Professor:
Professor
Baraër, Michel
Affiliation: Génie de la construction
Date Deposited: 04 Mar 2024 15:51
Last Modified: 11 Mar 2024 16:11
URI: https://espace2.etsmtl.ca/id/eprint/28389

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